vegetable

  • Grow at Home: Turnips


    3_turnips_purple_growing_in_ground
    Turnips are an easy to grow crop to grow at home.  And if you've been put off by the flavourless shop bought version, you may be pleasantly surprised by what a delicious and versatile crop it can be.

    Although the root is normally round, cylindrical root shapes are not uncommon in earlier varieties and colours can range from white to yellow and purple.

    Where to grow turnips

    Turnips thrive in firm, fertile soil that retains moisture. Dig in the autumn and incorporate plenty of well rotted manure or garden compost to help retain moisture.

    Grow best in a sunny position but can tolerate some degree of shade.

    As always, especially with root crops, rotate your planting to avoid soil-borne pests and diseases.

    Sowing Turnips

    For an early crop, start by sowing under cloches in late winter - Easy Tunnel or Lantern Cloches would both work well and will also help protect spring sowings from particularly harsh spells of weather.

    Sow thinly in rows 1cm deep with 20 cm between rows.  For the early crops and thin to around 15cm apart after germination. Successional sowing during spring and summer will ensure a steady supply.

    For turnips to be harvested in autumn or winter sow in late summer to the same depth but thin to 20cm between rows for a slightly larger root.

    Aftercare

    Water regularly to prevent bolting.  Keep rows weed free using a Speedhoe

    Harvesting and Storage

    Pick turnips harvested in summer when they are the size of a golf ball - don't allow them to become woody and they will taste better when picked young.

    bunch_of_harvested_turnips_on_bench

    Leave autumn and winter varieties in the ground and harvest when required.  Alternatively lift and store in moist sand in a shed or garage or even easier, in a natural jute bag such as the Haxnicks Vegetable Sacks. (Great for your potatoes and carrots too!)

    Turnip Pests and Diseases

    They are prone to the same pests and diseases as cabbages;  mainly flea beetle.  You should avoid growing in ground previously used for brassicas and cabbages, considering turnips in the same group when planning crop rotation.

    Violet rot and clubroot can be a problem which can be prevented by good crop rotation.  To combat it destroy any affected plants on the bonfire or dispose of away from the garden.

  • Salad anyone?

    We have returned back to a very grey and rainy England with not much hope for our little shoots after slight neglect for a week. However, we were greeted with huge shoots bursting to get out of their Rootrainers!  Seems like time to get the husband out building the Haxnicks Raised Bed with it’s very handy Raised Bed Polythene Cover to keep those courgettes, cucumbers and tomatoes growing upwards and outwards into something edible for my plate.

    Haxnicks Raised Bed with polythene cover on and plants inside I have plants now in my Raised Bed

    Most of all, the joy of this Raised Bed is that you construct and locate it wherever you wish, so for convenience it is sitting right outside our kitchen garden door.  As much as I love my garden who wants to traipse to the end of it to pick their veggies!  We have added a variety of herbs too - why not!

     Haxnicks Raised Bed with polythene cover off and salad plants showing  

    Pull back the polythene cover for easiy watering and as you can see we have a little bed of very healthy young plants which we hope to harvest sometime in July.  We will be back in July with an update!

    Haxnicks Raised Bed with polythene cover off and slightly larger salad plants inside Really growing now - here comes summer!

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