spuds

  • Product Bite: Vigoroot Potato/Tomato Planters

    What are Vigoroot Potato/Tomato Planters:

    Vigoroot_potato/Tomato_planterVigoroot Potato/ Tomato Planters are air-pruning planters that offer a super easy way to grow bigger plants such as potatoes and tomatoes.

    What crop are they for:

    They are mainly used for potatoes and tomatoes but could any root veg  such as carrots or parsnips where the added depth will allow them to thrive.  You could even grow fruit trees such as damsons in them.

    They take 40 Litres of compost and will take 3 seed potatoes or two large tomato plants.

    Where can I use them:

    Use anywhere in the garden, patio, balcony or terrace.  They are 35cm in daimeter so you only need a tiny space to get growing.

    What's so special about it?

    Pink_potato_flower Potato flower

    The Vigoroot fabric is what makes them special.  The magic of this fabric comes from its ability to ‘air-prune’ the roots of plants, dramatically changing their formation and their ability to sustain the plant in a limited volume of compost. It encourages more vigorous rooting, which enables the plants to absorb more nutrients. It prevents the roots from growing too long, and helps prevent plants from becoming ‘pot-bound’ which would normally limit the plants’ growth. This means that the plants can grow to a much larger size in a relatively small pot.

    The super strong root system also helps the plants to become more resistant to harsh weather, pests and diseases. Used for many years by commercial growers, the benefits of air-pruning technology are well recognised by the trade.

    They also take all the hard work out of growing potatoes.  There is no digging to prepare the bed and come harvest time you simply tip the planter over and pull out the potatoes. 

    Find out more: 

    See it in action: To see it in action head over to our YouTube channel Vigoroot Patio Planters

    Related Blogs:  Read about it in use Grow at Home: Damsons or Grow at Home: Broad Beans

    Buy it Now:  See them here Vigoroot Potato/Tomato Planters

     

  • Product Bites: Haxnicks Potato Planters

    What are Potato Planters:

    Potato Planters are the super easy way to grow potatoes.  A pack of 3 large planters with good drainage that make it easy to grow this kitchen staple.

    What crop are they for:

    Any type of potatoes from little salad ones to large baking types.  They take 40 Litres of compost and come in a pack of 3.  Each one will take 3 to 4 seed potatoes.

    Where can I use them:

    Use anywhere in the garden, patio, balcony or terrace.  They are 35cm in daimeter so you only need a tiny space to get growing.

    What's so special about it?

    Pink_potato_flower Potato flower

    They take all the hard work out of growing potatoes.  There is no digging to prepare the bed.  Simply fill them a third full to start and plant your seed potatoes.  Then as the plants emerge just cover them up again with compost. Repeat until the planter is full.  This is much easier to achieve in planters than in the ground where you have to dig large trenches.

    The other big advantage is at harvest time.  To harvest, spread out a large plastic sheet and tip the planter over onto it.  Search through the compost and you will find your lovely crop.   Much easier than having to dig the plants up and hunt for the crop.

    Find out more: 

    See it in action: To see it in action head over to our YouTube channel Potato Planters

    Related Blogs:  Read about it in use Grow at Home: Potatoes

    Buy it Now:  See them here Potato Planters

     

  • Fluffy, melt in the mouth potato scones for dinner anyone?

    I am about to harvest my second lot of potatoes - tonight if the rain stays away long enough.  And I am planning a frenzy of potato related cookery to celebrate starting with these light and fluffy Potato Scones.  Perfect for breakfast with a nice fried egg and some good brown fruity sauce but just as at home served at a dinner party.

    Potato Scones

    This recipe for Potato Scones is a newish one to me, but a brilliant find. Anything different to do with potatoes is always interesting. My children love these and so do I.  Because they are filling I almost feel as if they are a meal in themselves. They are rather smarter than plain ordinary mash, and go really well with either sausages or something special like poached salmon.

    Preparation: 10 minutes Cooking time: 25 minutes

     

    Makes: 10 – 12 scones

     

    Ingredients:Pile_of_Small_potato_scones

    5 medium sized potatoes

    1 tbsp butter

    2oz (50g) plain flour

    Salt and pepper

    1 tbsp olive oil

     

     

     

     

    Directions:

    1. Firstly peel, cook and mash the potatoes.

    2. Add the butter to the potatoes and mix until melted.

    3. Add enough flour to make the mixture pliable like dough.

    4. Make up 8cm x 1.5cm (3 x 1/2”) rounds, you should be able to make about 10 or 12 of these.

    5. Prick the surface of each scone with a fork – this allows the heat through to the centre of the scone, when cooking it.

    6. Meanwhile heat up a frying pan with just a little olive oil, covering the bottom.

    7. Place the scones in the pan and fry them gently for about 3 minutes on each side.

    8. Best served hot.

     

    I do hope that you enjoy these fluffy little morsels .  For a printable copy of the recipe click here.

  • The Potty Gardener sows Christmas Potatoes

    Haxnicks Garden Products can be brought onlineSurely it’s too early to be thinking about Christmas, I hear you say. At least I think I do, amongst the many other voices in my head. I am indeed thinking about Christmas. More specifically I am thinking about potatoes at Christmas. Even more specifically, delicious homPotato_Patio_planterse-grown roast potatoes at Christmas being proudly placed on the table to gasps of awe and admiration and maybe a harmonious chorus of Gloria!

    some people even ask 'Can I grow potatoes in winter?' or 'Can i grow my Christmas Roast potatoes?' - the answer is yes!  But if you don't like digging frozen ground then follow my lead.

    Normally, British potatoes are home-grown from early spring throughout the summer. Instead I am planning to sow some spuds now in Potato Planters, nurture them through the autumn and hopefully harvest them in time to share oven space with whatever beast we decide to roast for Christmas lunch this year.

     

    Which variety?

    At this time of year, cold-stored potato tubers should available from specialist seed merchants.  Maris Peer or Nicola are good winter varieties that don’t need chitting.  Having said that the ones that I have just picked up from my local Garden Centre are vigorously chitting.  Looks like they are chomping at the bit.  So we will see if this makes a difference.

    If you are in search of an answer to wheher potatoes can grow potatoes...  I have had varying success in the past just using supermarket spuds. Grandpa Haxnicks tells me that this is because harvested potatoes go into a dormant state for some months before they are ready to produce new shoots. So, either I found particularly stress resistant tubers in the supermarket.  Or they had been on the shelf for a long time and were very ready to get out and breed!

    So how late can I plant potatoes in the UK?  For second cropping potatoes - late August is a good time to plant.  They should be ready 11 weeks after planting so work back and you should actually be OK until some time in September.

    how_to_palnt_potatoes_in_Haxnicks_Potato_Patio_Planter

    How to Plant Potatoes

    Plant your eager-to-breed tubers in the Potato Planters.  Plant on about 6 inches of multi- purpose compost and cover with the same amount again. Each time the foliage pushes through the soil, cover it again until the bag is full. Keep them watered and fed with a liquid fertiliser. The Bag can be kept in a greenhouse, but should also be OK outside provided they are given frost protection. If you want to know can potatoes survive frost and snow then the answer is yes if properly dressed. A cosy Fleece Jacket should do the trick, no need to bother with a scarf or gloves. In the autumn, when the foliage yellows and dies back you can cut it off.  If you want to know can potatoes survive frost and snow then the answer is yes if properly dressed.  Then leave the potatoes in fairly dry soil until Christmas. Once harvested, be reassured that they will then enter their dormant state and wil be perfect for peeling and roasting.

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