Pea and Bean Patio Planter

  • The Potty gardener growing peas in containers

    Haxnicks Garden Products can be brought online

    Last month Grandpa Haxnicks  gave me 3 tips for growing peas in containers for an early as possible crop...

    Rootrainers

    Warmth

    Love

    So I got hold of some Rootrainers, wrapped up warm, and gave myself a hug. So far so good, my peas are doing well!

    Peas growing in Haxnicks Rootrainers

    I chose an early variety of pea suitable for container growing. Douce Provence claims to be sweet and compact, growing to approximately 60cm tall. Just my sort of pea. I sowed the first peas half a finger deep in Deep Rootrainers about 6 weeks ago and since then have made two other fortnightly sowings for a longer cropping season.  Thanks to the cosy environment of my Sunbubble, an unusual amount of sunshine and of course tender, loving care from me, the peas are now healthy looking plants.

    Healthy Pea Roots in Haxnicks Rootrainers

    It is not surprising that they are looking so good on top when you see what a super root system they have formed in the Rootrainers.  As you can see the Rootrainer cells open up like a book making them easy  to plant without disturbing the roots.

    Haxnicks Pea Bean Patio Planter

    This morning, I found last year's pea and bean patio planter in the darkest most spidery corner of my garden shed and filled it up with a good multi purpose compost ready to accommodate the first pea plugs . With 1m bamboo canes and some Soft-Tie I built a tepee for the Pea and Bean Patio Planter. There are some helpful little cane support pockets on the outside which keep the support canes in place. The peas are now happily bedded in and hopefully ready to climb towards fruition. It is such a sunny day that I'm leaving them out to get used to the big wide world and adjust to outside temperatures, but I will be sure to tuck them up again tonight (perhaps with a bedtime story, there is one about a fussy Princess that I think they will enjoy).

    Rootrainers, warmth and love...easy peasy!

  • CaneToppers for the Potty Gardener

    Haxnicks CaneToppers

    My planters, pots and their contents have happily survived our house move but did suffer somewhat along the way due to abandonment and stormy weather…

    Having packed up the removal lorry and two family cars, locked up the old house, pulled out of the drive in triumphant convoy and traveled 350yds with a satisfied smile, it suddenly dawned on me that we had left behind my entire potted garden. The satisfied smile was replaced by a weary wince as I realised that we barely had room for a single strawberry (a squashed one at that), let alone a dozen pots and planters. I did for a moment consider swapping my noisy children in the back of my car for the placid plants, but I didn’t think the next occupants of our house would be quite so understanding about left over children as opposed to left over plants. So it was clear that we would have to return to Gloucestershire to collect a final car load of plants. Just one more 120 mile round trip to add to the many made in the last few weeks!

    Haxnicks Range of Patio Planters

    Amazingly, despite the searing heat and lack of tender loving care that followed before someone was able to bring home the plants, they neither died of thirst nor were eaten by giant slugs. However, they did then suffer from rough man-handling (definitely not woman-handling) in transit, arriving home with a few broken stems. More damage was done when they were left overnight in an exposed position without support canes and were somewhat battered in an amazing blockbuster style thunder storm.

    Haxnicks Patio Planters with CaneToppers

    Our new garden is a little more exposed to the wind than the last and so the reinstated bamboo support canes need a little extra help to stand to attention. I subtly suggested to Grandpa Haxnicks that some CaneToppers would be the perfect moving in present. Subtle suggestion turned to pleading request and the cane toppers duly arrived on my doorstep. Popped on top of the wind wobbled canes ( a hair-raising job for me ) they are helping to add stability and a little more style than the scrappy bits of string that were holding the canes in place before.

    Happily all is now good, the sweet peas are blossoming, the strawberries are juicy, the tomatoes are swelling and I have faith that the potatoes and carrots are doing their stuff down in their earthy depths. I am very much looking forward to harvesting and feasting soon.

     

  • Pippa Greenwood - Q&A - Part II

    The second in our series of questions and answers from Pippa Greenwood.  Please remember we are open for more questions at the bottom - just leave a comment and we'll get our panel of experts to answer your questions.


    Q: How can I keep my greenhouse a bit cooler in the height of the summer?
    A: Make sure that greenhouses and conservatories have adequate shading – temperatures soon soar in this warmer weather and plants inside will dry out rapidly and may be severely scorched. Paint on shading is the cheapest and is readily available from the garden centre but a conservatory is better fitted with more attractive looking blinds in the long term. Keep vents and windows open as much as possible too so that cooler air can come in. Try to allow a through draught, and even consider fitting an extra window or vent. The old-fashioned remedy of ‘damping down’ works brilliantly too – simple water any hard-standing such as the path in the greenhouse, as the water evaporates it uses heat energy and so temperatures drop.

    Q: There is ivy growing up through my well-established hornbeam hedge, will it harm the hedge?
    A: Much as I love ivy (and am not one for removing it from trees), if the ivy is starting to get a hold in your hedge, I’d be inclined to try to remove it. It is a vigorous plant and although I’m sure it won’t kill the hedging plants, it can start to swamp them and may lead to a degree of gappyness in the foliage covering as the hedge comes in to full leaf. The easiest way is to try to dig out the ivy at the base, or failing this, to sever the stem from the base, and then pull off the dead ivy plants once they have turned brown.

    Q: My hostas are riddled with holes, any suggestions?
    A: Hostas and holes pretty well always means slugs, and possibly snails.

    If they are growing in pots try using a copper based paint or a self-adhesive copper tape applied around the rim of the pot – slugs and snails hate crossing copper. If they are in open ground I suggest you try setting traps eg beer traps, and also consider using a nematode biological, or an organic slug control as this way you can kill them off without endangering the wildlife.

    Q: Can I grow a rose in a pot?
    A: yes, you can, but looking after it will definitely be much more effort than if it were growing in open ground! If you cannot plant it in open ground then I suggest you use as large a pot as possible, ideally something like a half barrel, and use a loam-based compost with added grit, something like John Innes number 3 would be good, plus some horticultural grit.

    Q: How do I know what size containers to use for my patio veg. I have a tiny flat with a small balcony and need to be as space-saving as possible?
    A: Assuming the balcony is up to the job (and please do check first!!) the bigger the better, but generally speaking I find pot-shaped containers work better than growing bags as they allow you to put in a top quality compost, and are easier to keep moist. A minimum of about 30cm3 , but ideally bigger is what I would recommend. If space and weight are an issue, then try the crop bags made from a sort of plasticised hessian material as these are very light weight, available in a range of sizes, fold flat and tiny for off-season storage, and have brilliant drainage holes in them!

    Q: I’ve just noticed that my apple tree has several areas on it where the branches are all bobbly and swollen, but they seem to be coming in to leaf OK. What is this?
    A: It sounds as if they were hit by woolly aphid. This sap-sucking pest causes you stems to swell and distort as it feeds, but its a symptom that is often first noticed when the plants start to grow in the spring. Once this damage has appeared the infested stem may start to die back, especially when the damage is severe, or if apple canker disease gets in via the wounded bark. I suggest you prune out the worst affected areas.

    Q: Is it too late to sow peas in March?
    A: Its certainly worth sowing some peas in March and in many areas, the soil stays so very wet and so extremely cold well into March, so for much of the country sowing any earlier is not possible! If the soil is still a bit wet and cold where you are, I suggest you sow the seed in cells, root-trainer pots or small flower pots and then transplant the peas when the plants are three or four inches tall and things have warmed up a bit. Remember to get some twiggy sticks in to the soil when you sow the seed or plant the young peas out, these will act as supports as the peas grow.

    Q: Is it true that it is not a good idea to cut an established hedge in spring, and if so, why?
    A: Its certainly true, and in fact as the bird nesting season has officially started in spring, it is actually illegal to do anything which might disturb nesting birds! The hedge itself would not mind, but you could very easily cause tragedy as far as the wild birds are concerned.

    Q: Some of my seedlings have suddenly died, sort of flopped over, can I save them?
    A: The most likely cause is damping off disease. This is caused by fungi, often introduced via unclean compost, trays or pots, or from non-mains water. Sadly there is no way you’ll be able to resurrect the seedlings but do check on your gardening hygiene. Its also worth watering seedlings with a dilute copper fungicide as this can help to prevent the infection getting a hold in the first place.

    Q: The winter has left my lawn riddled with moss, what can I do?
    A: First try to alleviate any compacted areas using a fork driven in deeply at intervals over the lawn. Then if you wish you could use a proprietary moss killer and, once the moss has been killed off, and after the delay period suggested on the pack, rake out the dead moss.

    Don’t do this any earlier than suggested or you may end up spreading the moss! If areas are very thin, you could then roughen up the surface and re-seed with fresh grass seed. Good lawn care ie feeding, scarifying and adequate water are the real key to a moss-free green carpet!

    Once again Pippa has given us a bonus question:

    Q: I am fed up with all the caterpillars I get in my brassicas, especially the calabrese, please, please suggest a chemical free solution?
    A: I never spray mine either, but with out a physical barrier you can guarantee a good crop of caterpillars! I plant low-growing brassicas under fleece or fine net pull-out tunnels, and taller ones a brilliant metal frame which comes with a fine mesh ‘jacket’ and a zip-up doorway – this is great because it is just tall enough for me to get in and so amongst the crop, making it very easy to harvest just what I want. Mesh covers like this will also protect against other flying pests such as aphids, cabbage root fly, flea beetle and so make organic veg growing so much easier!

    We cannot thank Pippa enough for these valuable tips and answers, please add your own questions and we'll try to help.

  • Chelsea Flower Show Review

    Chelsea Flower Show
    Emma models the Bag-to-Boot, whilst Emily tries to hide in the Pea and Bean Planter!

    We would really like to thank everyone who came to our stand at the Chelsea Flower Show 2009. It was, for Haxnicks, an incredible experience and we thoroughly enjoyed it, and were pretty much flat out from 7am to 8pm every day!

    Because Chelsea is such a great experience we decided early on to get as many of our staff to 'have a go' at running the stand for a couple of days at a time. This provided a great day out and lots of lessons for us at Haxnicks about what customers really think of our products - all positive I might add...

    The Haxnicks Planters proved their popularity, selling continuously throughout the show, with a lot of people taking the chance to get some last minute potato planters going- it is still not to late to enjoy home grown organic vegetables.

    However ultimately we would like to thank Chelsea for allowing us, during our occasional breaks, to tour (whizz) around the amazing gardens.

    Victoria's Rootrainers Demonstrations at Chelsea Flower Show Simon at the Chelsea Flower Show
    Victoria takes a break from her Rootrainer demonstrations, and convinces herself that our Pots Naturally palm tree is actually a real palm, somewhere on a beautiful beach... ...whilst Simon gets into his sales pitch, Julia demonstrates some other uses for the Haxnicks Baby Victorian Bell, and Emily surveys the scene.
  • Haxnicks Goes to Chelsea

    For the first time Haxnicks will be appearing at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2009.Haxnicks at the 2009 RHS Chelsea Flower ShowWe will be selling Rootrainers, Patio Planters, Canetoppers and Soft-tie off the stand, and offering mail order delivery on the rest of the Haxnicks product range. Also there is a special show discount of 15% on all payments taken at the stall.

    Come and find us at Stall EA110 to buy, order, or just to have a chat!

  • Patio Planters for Britain's Favourite Home Grown Veg

    Some of Britain’s most popular home-grown vegetables – peas, beans, tomatoes – need more upward growing space, which is not always easy to accommodate on patios and balconies.

    Patio Planters from HaxnicksHelp is at hand, Haxnicks is extending its best-selling Patio Planter™ range with the addition of a green Pea & Bean Patio Planter (RRP £19.99) that comes with a six- foot tall adjustable tubular-steel growing frame; and a red Climbing Tomato Patio Planter (RRP £19.99) complete with a three-sided, metal climbing support frame.

    Haxnicks have also launched an alternative tomato planter, the Tomato (Bush & Trailing) Patio Planters (RRP £14.99). A pack of three 45cm-high red planters which provide the extra height needed to accommodate bush and trailing varieties.

    The robust planters are made from woven polyethylene and come with sturdy handles on each side. To ensure the best possible drainage, they have reinforced drainage holes in and around the sides of the base. They are ideal for small gardens, patios and balconies and, unlike most large planters, fold away flat for easy storage.

    Haxnicks' Vegetable Patio Planters on SaleThe reusable planters make a great value alternative to regular containers and provide the space-efficient option when space is at a premium. New Haxnicks Patio Planters™ are available now from all good garden centres. For more information, call Haxnicks on 0845 241 1555.

6 Item(s)