MIcromesh Pest and Wind Barrier

  • Grow at Home: Broccoli and Calabrese

     

    broccoli_plant

    Broccoli (Purple Sprouting) and Italian Calabrese are often confused as the supermarket sold 'broccoli' is in fact the large green headed calabrese.

    Purple Sprouting Broccoli is an excellent crop for filling the harvesting gap at the end of the winter and heralds the start of the new grow your own season for many gardeners.

    Where to grow

    All forms of broccoli and calabrese do best in an open sunny position. Protection from strong winds will prevent the plants from rocking.

    Both require a rich soil. Manure in the Autumn and apply lime  if necessary to bring the pH up to 6.5-7 in particular for the purple sprouting variety.

    Sowing

    During Spring sow purple sprouting seed thinly in rows to a depth of 1cm with 15cm between rows. After germination thin to 5 cm apart in preparation for transplanting to their final position.  Calabrese do not transplant as happily so should ideally be sown direct and thinned to 30 cm apart. Easy Poly Tunnels will aid germination and Easy Net Tunnels protect the young seedlings from birds.

    Transplant deeply with the first leaves sitting on the soil surface to discourage cabbage root fly and help stabilise the plant.  Firm in well, again to help secure the plant and eliminate any air pockets.

    Aftercare

    Keep well watered during dry periods to allow healthy growth throughout the long growing season.  Mulching the rows with garden compost will help retain moisture and keep weeds in check as will regular weeding between rows with a Speedhoe will help loosening the soil around the developing plants.

    Harvesting and Storage

    Start harvesting in late winter and continue through to mid spring, depending on the variety grown.  Harvest shoots of Purple Sprouting varieties  before they flower at around 15cm long.  Regular cutting encourages new shoots and any that reach flowering stage should be removed to prevent exhausting the plant.

    Calabrese can be harvested from late summer to early autumn.  Heads should be cut, starting from the central flower head, while still tightly closed. Spread harvesting of the crop to avoid completely stripping a plant.

    Broccoli Pests and diseases

    Cabbage root fly is the main pest to effect broccoli and calabrese.  Protect with fleece during the early stages to help avoid this - Easy Fleece Tunnels or Fleece Lantern Cloche are ideal.

    In order to prevent damage to the roots from wind rock (damage to the roots of young plants, caused by the movement of the stem in the wind.)use a Micromesh Pest & Wind Barrier

     

  • Grow at Home - Perfect Parsnips

    Parsnips_piled_in_basket

    Parsnips are a good vegetable for the inexperienced gardener as they require very little work and are easy to grow.  Parsnips taste great used in stir-fries, mashed with potato or carrot or as an accompaniment to a traditional roast.

    Where to grow parsnips

    Do not grow parsnips on freshly manured ground - a bed manured for a previous crop in the preceding season would be ideal. Ideally the soil needs to be stone free and dug over during the winter to produce the best quality parsnips and adding compost from your heap will help to improve the soil without it becoming over rich.

    Parsnips like an open sunny site, but will tolerate light shade.

    Sowing

    Sow in late winter to late spring in drills 1cm deep and space seed about 15cm apart.  Alternatively sow in rows and thin out at the seedling stage.  Rows should be spaced 30cm apart and protection with Easy Tunnels will aid germination, which can take up to three weeks.

    Intercropping between the rows is a good idea with rocket or radish working well.

    Aftercare

    Thin out the seedlings to 15cm apart and water the crop during dry periods - parsnips hate to dry out.  Regular weeding between rows with a Speedhoe will help avoid damaging the crowns of the developing plants.

    Harvesting and Storage

    Start harvesting them when the foliage begins to die down in mid Autumn.  The best tasting parsnips are lifted after the first frosts.  Lift them only when required - the remainder can be left in the ground through to late winter.

    A slight cautionary tale - parsnips are related tot he Giant Hogweed which means the leaves can cause severe skin irritation and blistering.  So if you have sensitive skin then consider wearing gloves when harvesting or weeding around the plants.

    Parsnip Pests and diseases

    Generally trouble free but Parsnip Canker can affect the crop, especially in acid or over manured soils. Carrot Fly can be a problem in some areas so as a precaution it would be sensible to try a Micromesh Pest & Wind Barrier

     

  • Grow at Home - Brussels Sprouts

    Brussels Sprouts are delicious if cooked well – home growing can convert even the most ardent sprout avoider! There are many really tasty and reliable F1 Hybrids available, which freeze well and with a bit of planning you could be harvesting right through the winter.

    Where to grow

    Brussels Sprouts thrive in an open sunny position that is protected from strong winds.

    Dig the soil well and incorporate well-rotted manure of garden compost in Autumn. Sprouts do not grow well in acidic soil so add lime if necessary to bring the pH up to 6.5-7

    Sowing

    Sow outside in a nursery bed from early to mid spring. Start by sowing the early varieties and successionally sow mid season and later varieties in turn. Sow thinly in rows 1cm deep with 15cm between rows.

    After germination, thin out the seedlings to 8cm apart. Transplant when the seedlings are 10cm high – watering well the previous day will help the seedlings lift easily – and Plant in rows with 75cm between plants - The space between rows is ideal for a catch crop such as salad.

    Firm the soil well to prevent air pockets and help keep the plants stable.

    For late summer picking start the sowing off in Rootrainers under glass in late winter. Harden off and plant outside when the young plants are 10cm high using cloches to protect during the early stages - Easy Tunnels are ideal if you plant in rows and for block planting an Easy Lantern Cloche will do the job well.

    Aftercare

    An Net Easy Tunnel will deter pigeons. Weed throughout the growing season and water in dry periods. Apply a foliar feed during the summer and stake any plants that need it. During the early Autumn draw the soil around the stems to steady the plants against the wind - A  Micromesh Pest & Wind Barrier will give extra protection. Apply felt or plastic collars around the base of the plants to prevent cabbage root fly from laying it’s eggs

    Harvesting and Storage

    Start harvesting from the bottom of the plant, picking the sprouts when they are still tight, after the first frosts as this improves the flavour. Pick just a few from each plant and every time you harvest work further up the stem. When all the sprouts have been harvested you can cut off the top of the plant and use as you would cabbage.

    Pest and diseases

    Prone to the same problems as cabbages the main issue is Club Root – a soil borne fungal disease. Infected plants should be destroyed and not composted.

    Small white butterfly caterpillar and aphids may also affect the crop. Protect the crop from butterflies with net and remove caterpillars by hand and I spray aphids with soapy water.

  • How to Protect Carrots from Carrot Fly

    You might think it is too early to think about carrot fly.  However, there is a lot you can do at the planting stage to ensure you get a healthy crop.  So well worth reading this now before you sow.

    If you have yet to experience that awful sinking feeling of lifting carrot after carrot riddled with dark crevices, tunnelled out by the dreaded carrot fly larvae, then consider yourself lucky. But for those of you that have, fear not! Haxnicks have been fighting various garden pests for over 20 years, and have picked up a few tricks along the way...

    How to protect your Carrots from Carrot Fly with Haxnicks
    Image courtesy of www.morguefile.com

    But first... some facts about carrot fly:

    • Carrot fly also affects other vegetables in the parsley family, such as Parsnip, Celery, Dill, Coriander, Fennel and Celeriac
    • They are attracted to the smell of bruised foliage
    • The larvae that damage the roots can continue to feed through the autumn into winter, moving between plants
    • The adult carrot fly is approximately 9mm long.  It is a slender, metallic, greenish-black fly with yellow legs and head. Larvae are creamy white, tapering maggots

    How can you tell if your carrots are infected? - Check for reddening of the foliage and stunted growth

    So now we know a little bit about the pest itself, we can look at some of the ways which we can protect our crops from infestations:

    1.  Make sure to avoid using previously infested ground. Carrot fly larvae are capable of surviving through the winter.  So avoid re-sowing any vegetable from the Parsley family (see above)
    2. Avoid sowing during the main egg-laying periods, which are (for most parts of the UK): mid-April to the end of May & Mid-July to the end of August.
    3. Sow disease and pest resistant varieties such as Fly Away F1 and Resistafly F1, available from garden centres and online seed suppliers.
    4. Erect a fine-mesh barrier at the time of sowing – at least 70cm high. Check out our Micromesh Pest & Wind Barrier which will work for containers and open ground.  Or a Micromesh Tunnel - with 0.6mm netting it will keep the Carrot Fly from getting to your precious crop.
    5. Sow thinly so as to avoid ‘thinning out’, releasing the smell of bruised foliage
    6. Thin out or harvest on a dry evening with no wind – or use scissors so that no bruising of foliage occurs
    7. Try companion planting - growing varieties of pungent Rosemary, Sage or Marigold as a deterrent/’smokescreen’
    8. Grow your carrots in a tall planters - for example the Haxnicks Oxford fabric planter or Carrot Patio Planters
    9. Lift main carrot crops by Winter, especially if any are infected – don’t leave them in the ground to serve as food for overwintering larvae.

    Thinning out tip: Use scissors to avoid bruising the foliage (and releasing the carrot-fly attracting scent)

    To find out more about carrot fly, and the other pests that may arrive in your garden check out Pippa Greenwood's excellent RHS book for plant by plant advice on Pests and Diseases

    Have you any experience of carrot fly damage? What do you think went wrong? Please let us know your thoughts using the comments section below.

  • Keeping Out the Easter Bunny and all his friends!

    Haxnicks Garden Products can be brought onlineThe Easter Bunny is no myth. Every year, just as carefully nurtured seedlings are beginning to flourish, the Easter bunny appears. Sponsored by Cadbury’s he is duty-bound to hide chocolate eggs in your garden. However, he and his accomplices seem to think that in return for this uninvited favour it is perfectly acceptable to help themselves to whatever delicacies lie in their path. So, be ready this Easter and protect your emerging crops against these greedy nibblers!

    Keeping Rabbits away from Garden Plants

    Growing your veg in pots and planters means that juicy crops may be harder to reach for the rabbits, but those of you with a ground level vegetable patch have a harder task. Rabbit-proof fencing needs to be at least 120cm high with 30cm dug below the ground and a 15cm 'skirt' bent outwards to stop them digging their way in. When you factor in the fence posts this all adds up to beyond the annual defence budget of most gardeners.

    Protecting Garden Plants from Rabbits

    So, instead of protecting the entire garden you could just protect the most vulnerable plants.  A Micromesh Pest and Wind Barrier is a cheap and easy way to surround a raised bed and due to the tiny gauge mesh will also give protection against insect invasion such as carrot fly.

    Haxnicks Micromesh Easy Tunnels offer great protection for garden plantsA crop cover such as a net or poly tunnel  can quickly be rolled out over a row to deter the rabbits. Just remember to pull the drawstring tight at the ends!

    Garden Cloche offers great protection for your Garden Plants from pests and wild animalsFor smaller, individual plants Bell Cloche will, amongst many other things, help to keep the bunnies at bay.

    Finally, if all else fails you could take a Mr McGregor style approach and chase the bob-tailed bandits with a rake. However, this may involve endless night-shifts as rabbits normally emerge to feed between dusk and dawn.  No wonder Mr McGregor was so grumpy!

  • Haxnicks helps orphans in Zambia to Grow their Own

    Haxnicks Speedhoe in full use in The Heal Project in Zambia

    Hello gardeners,

    I Have a heart-warming story to tell this month. Haxnicks has been preparing a new vegetable garden far from its homeland in sunny Zambia. Inspired by my great grand-daughter Lali Cardozo and her work with an orphanage near Lusaka, we sent out a team of enthusiastic gardeners armed with Haxnicks products, a generous donation of seeds from Suttons and lots of energy. Our aim was to kick-start a vegetable garden enabling the children of the orphanage to grow some exciting new fruit and veg that might make a refreshing and healthy change from maize and cabbage.

    Zambian children choosing Seeds given by Haxnicks

    Lots of children from the orphanage chose their own packets of seeds to plant: they all wanted to plant cucumbers, strawberries and melons!

     

    Zambian Children at the Heal Project planting Seeds from Haxnicks

    Rootrainers were used for the larger seeds such as squash, melons and cucumbers and the speciality tomatoes, when the Rootrainers ran out the children ran off to find any old empty plastic water bottles, or cups to sow more seeds in.

     

    Haxnicks Garden at the Heal Project in Zambia

    Easy net tunnels were used for protecting the seedlings in pots, micromesh fabric was laid over rows of seeds to protect against heavy downpours of rain during the rainy season. Micromesh barriers were put up around the beds to protect them from the cats, dogs, snails and wandering children. Birdscare was used to ward off the birds. Last but not least the ornamental frame of Big Ben was erected at the top of the patch in the hope that eventually peas will clamber up and the children will have great fun harvesting them.

    Seeds appearing in Haxnicks Rootrainers in the Vegetable GardenWith a downpour of rain and temperatures of 25 degrees within 4 days all the radishes had appeared as well as all the squash, melons and courgettes. 100% germination rate in the rootrainers! The children are hoping that they will have more than they can eat, and some to sell in the market. The orphanage has the space to make the garden bigger and Haxnicks plan to return to help expand the garden, build a fence around it with a gate, set up an automatic watering system and much more. Now the gardening team have returned, wondering in anticipation which seedlings are appearing, whether they will be washed away by the rain, die from drought, or mature into healthy bumper crops to fuel the children and a market stall business. Lali hopes to be able to send some updates and let us all know how things are progressing, but in the meantime she has sent this to tell you a little bit more about her friend Jeannie's orphanage.

    Lali Cardozo teaches at Heal Project School in Zambia

    'My friend Jeannie Mulenga is the inspiration behind The Heal Project, a charity set up in 1999 in Zambia. The Heal Project supports people living with HIV/Aids in Zambia working together towards a better life. Jeannie has 3 of her own children as well as thirty children who have nowhere else to turn, all of whom have lost their parents and many of whom are living with HIV. If you have been inspired, as I have by Jeanie and her wonderful children then please have a look at our Just Giving page.'

    I hope to be able to update you all soon with how things are going and growing at the orphanage, but in the meantime,

    Happy Gardening,

    Grandpa Haxnicks

  • John Negus reports from Fernhurst Horticultural Society

    Gardening guru John Negus has been out and about giving lectures and talks to gardening clubs, W.I.s and many other societies. After chatting to the Fernhurst Horticultural Society in Surrey on planting to a make a garden beautiful in winter, he conducted a quiz in which the winner left with a pack of Haxnicks’ Micromesh Pest and Wind Barrier. Ideal for shielding tender crops from the elements, and safeguarding them from winged invaders, it’s a great ally.John added, "Well done Haxnicks for stocking what gardeners of all persuasions need."

     

    Haxnicks Garden Products can be brought online

    John Negus (right) with ladies from Fernhurst Horticultural Society, Surrey

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