Extra Thick Fleece Blanket

  • Winter Plant Protection

    Haxnicks small Fleece Jackets for Winter Plant Protection

    Good morning Gardeners! Are you wrapping up to go outside today? Coat, scarf, gloves, woolly hat perhaps? Well, if so then spare a thought and a few pennies perhaps for your more vulnerable plants that might need something to keep the cold, damp and frostbite at bay. Wrap them up with a Haxnicks Easy Fleece Jacket, an Extra thick Fleece blanket or a Victorian Bell cloche. We often receive questions about looking after container grown plants in the winter (listen in Potty Gardener), one of the most common being cordyline palms. I would suggest gathering all the leaves together and holding them in an upright position with some string or soft-tie, but when it is really cold an Easy Fleece Jacket or even two should help to protect the foliage and stop the frost getting to the growing point of the palm. Do make sure to remove the jackets when the weather is warmer to avoid rotting.

    The Royal Horticultural Society offers some good advice on protecting plants during the winter months and unless I am very much mistaken it looks like they have opted to spend their pennies on a Haxnicks Victorian Bell Cloche.

    Growing White Flowers with Haxnicks

    Many plants bravely push on through the cold without any protection but one in particular never fails to give me a childlike surprise every year. Spotting the first modest blooms of snow drops in my garden always makes me smile, but if they are still hiding in your garden then why not wrap up and warm yourself inside and out by a visit to a snowdrop display in someone else's? The National garden Scheme has a list of snowdrop gardens open in aid of nursing and caring charities in February.

  • Growing Sweet Potatoes

    Growing Sweet Potatoes with HaxnicksThe Sweet potato is a versatile and increasingly popular vegetable and is certainly able to grow outdoors in the milder areas of the UK. In other areas it does well in the greenhouse, glasshouse or polytunnel. It is a scrambling, tender perennial closely related to Morning Glories and it grown as an annual and harvested in the early autumn.

    1. Take a few clean sweet potatoes and place into a container
    2. Cover them with peat and keep damp
    3. Leave in a warm place
    4. When ‘slips’ emerge from the surface to a height of 20cm, trim them off
    5. Pot into Compact Rootrainers and allow to grow on.

    When all frost danger is finished place them into their growing place. In late September, carefully dig them up. Leave for one week to mature in a warm place (allows skins to set and flavour to sweeten)

    Alternatively, order cuttings or slips, which will be delivered from late April onwards and pot the cuttings immediately into the Compact Rootrainer trays.

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